The scientific objective of the Basser Center for BRCA includes the funding of cutting-edge cancer research projects related to BRCA1/2 gene mutations ranging from basic science to clinical and translational research with an emphasis on collaborative projects shared between groups of scientists. To date, the Center has awarded nearly $15 million in internal and external grant funding to scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and throughout the nation, including four recent projects at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston Children’s Hospital, Emory University, and Columbia University. In a recent press release, executive director of the Basser Center and Basser Professor in Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Center, Susan Domchek, MD, said “The projects funded this year are among the most promising of BRCA-related cancer research anywhere.”

This external grants program, unusual among scientific centers, is made possible by a $5 million donation in 2014 by University of Pennsylvania alumni Mindy and Jon Gray. Their total giving to Penn is over $50 million, following a $25 million gift that established the Basser Center in 2012. The Center was created in memory of Mindy Gray’s sister Faith Basser, who died of BRCA-related ovarian cancer at age 44.

Internal Funding (for Penn Investigators)

The Basser Center has the unique opportunity to catalyze the assembly of teams to change the paradigm of discovery, innovation, and care for issues related to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 significantly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer and also are associated with prostate cancer and pancreatic cancer. Towards this end, the Basser Center seeks applications for two types of grants:

  • Basser Breakthrough Science Team Awards: Interdisciplinary groups of scientists propose innovative team approaches to a variety of key focus areas. 
  • Basser Outreach and Implementation Science Awards: Projects associated cancer by undertaking research that will optimize genetic testing, risk assessment, and clinical decision-making.-with the goal of reducing suffering and death from BRCA1 and BRCA2


The Basser Center internal funding program is currently closed to new applications.


External Funding


The Basser Center for BRCA at Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center announces the Basser External Research Grant Program, which focuses on projects that have the potential to advance the care of individuals living with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Research grant applications in basic science, prevention, early detection, or targeted therapeutics and relevant to the study of BRCA1/2 will be considered. Grants that demonstrate a potential for translation into clinical practice will be prioritized for funding.

  • Basser Innovation Award: Three $100,000, one-year, high-risk idea projects will be awarded. Six-month progress updates are required. A three-month notice of termination will be given if lack of progress is demonstrated. Final reports are required. 
  • Basser Team Science Award: A $1M, two-year ($500,000/year) project that must include a team with a minimum of two principal investigators. Preference is given to multi-institutional applications. Progress updates are required every six months. A first year annual report will determine second year of funding realization. A three-month notice of termination is given if lack of progress is demonstrated.


For questions related to the external grants program, contact Cecilia Scavellii, Associate Director for Research Administration at the Abramson Cancer Center, or call 215.349.8387. 


Current Grant Awardees

Internal Grants

 

Vaccination to Prevent BRCA1/2-Related Cancer
In this Breakthrough Science Team Award, principal investigators Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil and David Weiner, PhD and co-investigators Daniel Powell, PhDAndrea Facciabene, MD, PhDKatherine Nathanson, MDE. John Wherry, PhD, and Ben Stanger, MD, PhD are funded for three years to study the development of a novel vaccine that prevents BRCA1/2-related cancer in healthy individuals who carry BRCA1/2 mutations. As a first step toward this overall goal, this study will work to determine the clinical and immunological impact of vaccinating high-risk patients in remission after adjuvant therapy using TERT DNA with or without IL-12 DNA; optimize the generation of anti-tumor immunity in genetic mouse models of BRCA1/2-related cancers using prophylactic DNA-based vaccines; and discover new T cell antigens based tumor mutations in BRCA1/2 cancers.

Molecular Determinants of Chemo-Responsiveness of BRCA Mutant Cancers
For this three-year Breakthrough Science Team Award, principal investigators Roger Greenberg, MD, PhDLin Zhang,MDAndy Minn, MD, PhD, and Warren Pear, MD, PhD will collaborate with basic and clinical investigators from four core laboratories, including Wei Tong, PhDRobert Mach, PhDDavid Mankoff, MD, PhD, and Angela DeMichele, MD, MSCE to study the molecular basis of cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that dictate chemo-responsiveness of BRCA mutant cancers, and identify novel strategies that overcome common mechanisms of resistance.

Targeting the ATR/CHK1 Pathway in Treatment
Principal investigators Eric Brown, PhD and Fiona Simpkins, MD and co-investigators Rugang Zhang, PhD and Mark Morgan, MD are funded for two years for this Breakthrough Science Team Award to determine if ovarian and pancreatic BRCA2-deficient cancers can be treated by targeting the ATR/CHK1 pathway as a primary line of therapy, or be used secondarily following the development of PARPi resistance. This study may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for patients with BRCA1/2-deficient cancers and could spur future Phase I/II trials evaluating ATR/CHK1 inhibition as an alternative primary treatment or secondary treatment for BRCA1/2-mutation carriers.

Optimizing Access to Genetic Services for BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers
In this Outreach and Implementation Science Award, principal investigator Angela Bradbury, MD is funded for three years to test the effectiveness of TeleGenetics (telephone or videoconferencing) to provide cancer risk counseling and cancer genetic testing to individuals in communities with limited access to genetic services. Patients are randomly selected to receive remote genetic services at their community provider’s site by telephone or videoconferencing with a Penn genetic counselor or a usual care arm, where they will receive information on resources for genetic services in their area. The project aims to expand access to expert genetic providers in geographically and socio-demographically diverse populations with limited access to genetic services, improving the delivery of information and expanding the population of people who can benefit from learning about BRCA1/2-associated cancer risk.


External Grants


Mechanism Based Strategies to Overcome Resistance and Augment Response to Targeted Therapy in BRCA Mutant Cancer
In this Basser Team Science Award, principal Investigator Junjie Chen, PhD (MD Anderson Cancer Center) leads a multi-institutional team funded for two years to study novel mechanisms of chemotherapy responsiveness in BRCA mutation-related cancers and overcoming therapy resistance arising from these mechanisms. These studies will be performed at the level of basic laboratory investigation, using clinical samples from BRCA mutant breast and ovarian cancers that are naïve to therapy and in those that have acquired resistance. Achieving these objectives will allow for the development of more efficacious treatment strategies for BRCA patients.

Using PARP Inhibitors in the Treatment of Cancer
PARP inhibitors are a promising class of cancer treatment drugs. However, some cancers are resistant to PARP inhibitors while others can become resistant to PARP inhibitors over time. CDK12 is a protein that appears to help the cancer cell resist the beneficial effects of PARP inhibitors. So, stopping CDK12 might stop the cell’s ability to resist treatment. One way to stop CDK12 could be to promote THZ-5-31-1, which is a protein that inhibits CDK12. For this Basser Innovation Award, principal investigator Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, PhD (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) is funded for one year to assess how promoting THZ-5-31-1 might stop the body from accidentally repairing breast cancer cells. Also, he will explore if pairing THZ-5-31-1 with a PARP inhibitor could stop a tumor from growing.

Predicting the Best Treatment for Each Patient
Knowing the protein make-up of a tumor can help doctors predict how an individual patient will respond to different types of cancer treatments. For this Basser Innovation Award, principal investigator Zoltan Szallasi, MD (Boston Children’s Hospital) is funded for one year to establish a profile of the 53BP1 and Ku70 proteins that will help doctors predict how individual people with BRCA-associated cancers would respond to PARP inhibitors and platinum-based therapy. This will define a mutational profile measuring the relative activity of 53BP1 and Ku70 in BRCA mutant tumors, which will be an important step towards establishing a robust biomarker that reliably predicts response to platinum or PARP inhibitor based therapy in BRCA mutation carriers.

Inhibiting SIRT2 Activity to Inhibit BRCA Activity
BRCA proteins, which are made from BRCA genes, typically help in the repair of DNA damage that occurs in a cell’s life. There are other proteins, like SIRT2, that regulate how BRCA proteins perform this role in the cell. For this Basser Innovation Award, principal Investigator David Yu, MD, PhD(Emory University) is funded for one year to determine the significance of SIRT2’s regulation over BRCA1 protein activity and to determine if inhibiting SIRT2 might kill cells and tumors with BRCA1/BRCA2 dysregulation.

Development of a Culturally-tailored Decision Aid on BRCA Genetic Testing for Orthodox Jews
While it is known that 1 in 40 people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, the Orthodox Jewish community remains an under-studied population. Principal investigator Katherine Crew, MD (Columbia University) is funded for one year to develop a web-based decision aid, RealRisks, which is designed to improve genetic testing knowledge and accuracy of breast cancer risk perceptions, as well as self-efficacy to engage in a collaborative dialogue about BRCA genetic testing. The goal of this work is to develop a culturally-tailored decision aid for Orthodox Jewish women to enhance informed decision-making regarding BRCA genetic testing.


Previous Grant Awardees


Targeting Familial Breast Cancer with RAD52 Inhibitors
In this Basser Innovation Award, principal investigator Alexander Mazin, PhD (Drexel University) was funded to analyze the effect of RAD52 inhibitors in BRCA1/2 cells alone and in combination with therapeutic drugs, analyze the mechanism of RAD52 inhibition in vitro, and develop more effective analogs of RAD52 inhibitors through a medicinal chemistry approach.

Analyses of the Genetic Interaction Between PARP2 and the BRCA1/BRCA2 Tumor Suppressors: Towards Selective PARP Inhibitors
For this Basser Innovation Award, principal investigator Sonia Franco, MD, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) was funded to employ a genetic approach to test the hypothesis that PARP2 has PARP1-independent functions in the suppression of genomic instability in BRCA-deficient backgrounds. This will help define the mechanisms of action for PARPi in BRCA cells, setting the stage for future development of biomarkers and more specific PARP inhibitors.

The Role of BRCA1 Isoforms in PARP Inhibitor and Platinum Resistance
Principal investigator Neil Johnson, PhD (Fox Chase Cancer Center) was funded for this Basser Innovation Award to identify and characterize BRCA1 isoforms that are capable of contributing to DNA repair and drug resistance. This characterization could be useful for predicting which patients will have lasting responses to PARP inhibitor or platinum therapy based on establishing relationships between specific BRCA1 mutations and the likelihood of expressing particular BRCA1 isoforms.

When Numbers Matter: Decision Support for BRCA Genetic Testing
Principal Investigator Katherine Crew, MD (Columbia University) was funded to develop a program to screen underserved communities for BRCA mutations in the New York City area.

Minimizing Adverse Outcomes Following RRSO in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers 
In this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Susan Domchek, MD was funded to comprehensively investigate the effect of risk-reducing oophorectomy (RRSO) on a variety of health outcomes. Findings from this study will be helpful in advising patients on the best timing for oophorectomy and in establishing whether interventions to treat side effects are needed. To date, Dr. Domchek's team developed an interdisciplinary and international project to prospectively study BRCA carriers undergoing RRSO and have recruited 231 women into an extensive survey study of RRSO effects for women who have already undergone the procedure. In this grant cycle, Dr. Domchek's team began prospective recruitment and increased the survey study response rate to 500.

Comprehensive Evaluation of Cancer Risk Modifiers in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers
Timothy Rebbeck, PhD was awarded funding to study factors that modify BRCA1/2 cancer risks in carriers to provide information that may aid women and their providers in making optimal decisions about cancer prevention strategies in this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award. Dr. Rebbeck will further focus these studies on under-represented groups. To date, Dr. Rebbeck's team has undertaken a comprehensive synopsis of factors that modify BRCA1/2-associated cancer risks such as reproductive history, exposures, and modifying genes. In this grant cycle, Dr. Rebbeck's team will extend the above analyses and focus on the recruitment and analyses of these parameters in underrepresented populations.

Development of Vaccine Targeting the Tumor Vasculature for the Prevention of BRCA-Deficient Tumors 
In this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Andrea Facciabene, PhD worked to develop a potential vaccine for BRCA-related cancers that may teach the immune system to react to and destroy cancerous tissue. To date, Dr. Facciabene's lab identified the device needed to deliver the vaccine to humans, developed new DNA vectors for the vaccine to perform studies necessary to submit to FDA for trials in humans, and completed all pre-IND (investigational new drug) documentation necessary to submit to FDA. Dr. Facciabene's lab performed safety studies in an animal model in preparation for submitting an IND to FDA for clinical trials in humans.

Predictors of Healthy Mood and Memory After Oophorectomy 
C. Neill Epperson, MD was funded to study mood and memory in BRCA carriers before and after oophorectomy to determine who is at risk for adverse responses to the surgery and to determine ways to target prevention and treatment for mood and memory problems post-oophorectomy. For this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Dr. Epperson performed two randomized clinical trials to test hormone replacement therapy and a psychostimulant medication in women who were undergoing risk-reducing oophorectomy and women who had already undergone oophorectomy.

A Zebrafish Mutagenesis Screen to Identify Genes, Promote Initiation and Progression of BRCA2 Associated Ovarian Cancer 
For this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Michael Pack, MD was funded to identify and study mutations that occur in the development of BRCA2-related ovarian cancers in a zebrafish model. In addition to providing insight into BRCA2's role in the development of ovarian cancer, the mutations identified in the development of ovarian cancer may help define risk factors for the development of ovarian cancer in carriers, identify novel targets for anti-cancer drugs, and alter our approach to detection and treatment of BRCA2-related ovarian cancer.

A Fully Optimized CAR RNA T Cell-based Therapy for BRCA Cancer Treatment 
Daniel Powell, PhD was funded to further develop a potent immune-based therapy for BRCA-related breast cancers that teaches the immune system's T-cells to attack the cancer for this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award. Dr. Powell's laboratory focused on developing this potential therapy for trial in the clinic by exploring possible allergic responses and by developing a vector for delivering the therapy to humans in a future pilot study.

Eating and Exercise for BRCA+ Survivors: Addressing Heart and Bone Health
Kathryn Schmitz, PhD was funded to study the efficacy of a commercially available web-based nutrition and exercise program on a novel population of breast cancer survivors who have undergone risk-reducing oophorectomy under age 45 and who have not been on hormone replacement therapy for at least two years. For this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Dr. Schmitz studied cardiovascular and bone outcomes in order to provide a balanced understanding of the potential benefits of nutrition and exercise on these outcomes.

The Stone Family Award in BRCA Prevention Research: Telomerase Vaccination to Prevent BRCA1/2 Related Cancer 
David Weiner, PhD and Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, were funded to study a prevention vaccine aimed at reducing the risk of cancer is BRCA mutation carriers for this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award. Using an enzyme called hTERT, Drs. Weiner and Vonderheide aimed to develop a vaccine that teaches the body's immune system to fight BRCA-related cancers. They performed a series of preclinical studies using several mouse models of immune-prevention that were designed to prove the immunological concept, optimize the vaccine, and provide necessary data to file an investigational new drug application with FDA, the first step towards studying the vaccine in humans. Drs. Weiner and Vonderheide's work has been made possible by the Stone Family Award, created by Norman L. Stone, W'52 and Carol Stone to advance prevention research on BRCA1/2.

Chromatin Modifying Factors and BRCA1/2 
For this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award, Roger Greenberg, MD, PhD was funded to study other DNA errors present in BRCA-related cancers to determine if these errors predict response to certain therapies, towards the end of developing better chemotherapy approaches based on the specific genetic changes in BRCA-related cancers. To date, Dr. Greenberg's lab has identified molecular mechanisms that influence DNA damage responses to clinically important therapies and discovered a new BRCA1-related syndrome. In this grant cycle, Dr. Greenberg's lab will work to identify additional molecular mechanisms by which BRCA1 functions that may offer new targets for enhancing sensitivity to chemotherapies in BRCA-related cancers.

Interferon-Related DNA Damage Resistance Signature (IRDS) in BRCA Mutant Tumor
Andrew Minn, MD, PhD was funded for this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award to study how cells that surround cancers can play an important role in shaping cancer behavior. Dr. Minn's project aims to identify and understand signals that are sent from non-cancer cells to cancer cells that contribute to therapy resistance. To date, Dr. Minn's lab has uncovered how pathways that normally respond to viral infection can control treatment resistance, particularly in BRCA1-related breast cancers, and how inhibiting these pathways can improve the effectiveness of therapies. In this grant cycle, Dr. Minn will study these pathways and test a hypothesis that a step of this pathway is a potential drug target for addressing therapy resistance.

The Role of BRCA1 and Genomic Instability in Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis 
Ben Stanger, MD, PhD was funded for this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award to study the role of BRCA2 in the development of pancreatic cancers, specifically the role of BRCA2 in metastatic disease. Dr. Stanger's team will use mice models to study the role of BRCA2 in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether BRCA2 mutations and mutations in a related gene called PALB2 increase sensitivity to inhibitors of other molecular pathways.

Functional Genetic Approached to Identify MicroRNAs Regulating BRCAness in Breast and Ovarian Cancer 
For this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award, Lin Zhang, MD was funded to study the role of microRNA's, which are molecules that affect the action of genes, in the development of cancer and the sensitivity of cancers to chemotherapies. Dr. Zhang's team aims to identify the microRNAs present that make cancers exhibit features of BRCA-related cancers ("BRCAness"), to predict sensitivity to chemotherapies including PARP inhibitors and to develop well-annotated databases of breast and ovarian cancers for BRCA researchers.

Effects of AURKA and BRCA1 Dysregulation on Replication Fork Stability and Cell Survival Upon ATR/CHK1 Inhibition
Eric Brown, PhD was funded for this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award to study pathways involved in the development and drug-susceptibility of cancers that are related to BRCA1. AURKA and ATR/CHK1 are both pathways that are highly relevant in breast cancers. By studying the role of different pathways, Dr. Brown's team aims to translate their findings into potential uses of pathway-inhibitors in breast cancers that are BRCA1-deficient.

Whole Genome Sequencing of Breast and Ovarian Cancers Associated with BRCA1/2 Mutations 
Kate Nathanson, MD, was funded for this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award to sequence the DNA of breast and ovarian tumors for BRCA1/2 carriers to understand the molecular changes that may represent new targets for treatment or predict drug sensitivity or resistance to current regimens. To date, Dr. Nathanson's lab has identified multiple changes in 48 known cancer genes that are likely driving the growth of BRCA-related tumors and changes which suggest sensitivity to a range of experimental drugs. In the next cycle, Dr. Nathanson's lab will expand their analysis to explore thousands of gene mutations in BRCA-related tumors in the hopes of identifying novel pathways and drug targets in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutated tumors.

Blood-borne Biomarkers of Dysplasia and Early Cancer in Patients with BRCA Mutations 
Dr. Andrew Rhim's laboratory recently found that cells from the pancreas (and other organs) can enter the bloodstream when a pre-cancerous lesion is present but long before a tumor has formed. For this Early Detection Award, Dr. Rhim's work focused on applying this discovery of circulating epithelial cells (CEC's) to develop a screening method for detecting BRCA-related cancers early. To date, Dr. Rhim has initiated serial blood sampling in BRCA carriers treated at the Basser Center and has detected CEC's in BRCA mutation carriers without clinical diagnoses of cancer. In this grant cycle, Dr. Rhim continued to follow BRCA carriers with serial blood sampling to determine if CEC's can be used to identify patients with early cancer. In addition, Dr. Rhim's team profiled the genetic make-up of these cells to gain more information about their potential to develop into cancer.

Imaging Biomarkets for Risk Reduction Management of BRCA1/2 Carriers 
In this Early Detection Award, Despina Kontos, PhD was funded to study whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) provides useful information about the actual effect of risk-reducing methods on breast cancer risk. If DCE-MRI helps to predict which women are benefiting from each risk-reducing intervention, Kontos' team will provide new clinical decision-aid tools for improving risk-reduction and quality of life for BRCA carriers.

Next Generation Tomosynthesis Imaging for BRCA1/2 Carriers 
Andrew Maidment, PhD, FAAPM was funded for this Early Detection Award to study digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a novel imaging modality that may replace mammography in the future. DBT is currently limited to the detection of non-calcified lesions which is problematic because many cancers detected in BRCA2 carriers have cancers that present as calcified lesions. Dr. Maidment's team aimed to develop the next generation of DBT systems that may benefit BRCA mutation carriers by increasing early detection of BRCA-related breast cancers.

REACH: Research to Evaluate Adolescents and Early Communication of Hereditary Risk 
In this Communication and Risk Assessment Award, Dr. Angela Bradbury was awarded funding to study communication about hereditary cancer risk within families, with a focus on adolescents. Her work aimed to inform interventions that increase preventative behaviors and minimize adverse psychological outcomes in adolescents and young adults from BRCA families. To date, Dr. Bradbury's team reached 141 interviews with parents reporting on communication with 287 children, and also enrolled girls aged 11-19 years for interviews on knowledge and beliefs about breast cancer risk. During this grant cycle, Dr. Bradbury's team aimed to complete recruitment, analyze the relationship between what parents tell their children and the psychosocial adjustment of children, and begin to develop psychosocial interventions.

AFFIRM: Assessment of Fertility and Factors Influencing Reproduction and Menopause in BRCA Mutation Carriers 
Clarisa Gracia, MD, MSCE was funded for this Communication and Risk Assessment Award to study the impact of carrying a BRCA mutation on fertility and reproductive decisions. BRCA mutation carriers and a control group of BRCA1/2 negative women will be recruited to provide a blood spot for hormone level testing and to complete a questionnaire on fertility and the impact of BRCA on reproductive decision-making.

Minimizing Adverse Outcomes Following RRSO in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers
Susan Domchek, MD was funded for this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award to comprehensively investigate the effect of risk-reducing oophorectomy on a variety of health outcomes. Findings from this study will be helpful in advising patients on the best timing for oophorectomy and in establishing whether interventions to treat side effects are needed.

Comprehensive Evaluation of Cancer Risk Modifiers in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers
For this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevention Award, Timothy Rebbeck, PhD was awarded funding to study factors that modify BRCA1/2 cancer risks in carriers to provide information that may aid women and their providers in making optimal decisions about cancer prevention strategies.

Development of Vaccine Targeting the Tumor Vasculature for the Prevention of BRCA-deficient Tumors
Andrea Facciabene, PhD was funded for this Cancer Risk Reduction and Prevent Award to develop a potential vaccine for BRCA-related cancers that may teach the immune system to react to and destroy cancerous tissue.

Chromatin Modifying Factors and BRCA1/2
Roger Greenberg, MD, PhD was funded for this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award to study other DNA errors present in BRCA-related cancers to determine if these errors predict response to certain therapies, towards the end of developing better chemotherapy approaches based on the specific genetic changes in BRCA-related cancers.

Interferon-Related DNA Damage Resistance Signature (IRDS) in BRCA Mutant Tumor
For this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award, Andrew Minn, MD, PhD had been funded to study changes in the DNA of BRCA-related tumors to evaluate whether these DNA changes predict response to chemo- and radiation therapies in order to determine optimal treatment strategies.

Whole Genome Sequencing of Breast and Ovarian Cancers Associated with BRCA1/2 Mutations
For this Cancer Therapy Targets and Predictors of Therapy Response Award, Kate Nathanson, MD, was funded to sequence the DNA of breast and ovarian tumors for BRCA1/2 carriers to understand the molecular changes that may represent new targets for treatment or predict drug sensitivity or resistance to current regimens.

Development of Molecular Imaging of Tumor Vasculature for the Early Detection of Hereditary Ovarian and Breast Cancer
For this Early Detection Award, Drs. George Coukos and Chungsheng Li investigated innovative molecular imaging techniques that visualize the tiny veins that grow to feed cancers which could lead to better methods for early detection of BRCA-related cancers.

Blood-borne Biomarkers of Dysplasia and Early Cancer in Patients with BRCA Mutations
For this Early Detection Award, Dr. Rhim's laboratory recently found that cells from the pancreas (and other organs) can enter the bloodstream when a pre-cancerous lesion is present but long before a tumor has formed. Dr. Rhim's work focused on applying this discovery to develop a screening method for detecting BRCA-related cancers early.

REACH: Research to Evaluate Adolescents and Early Communication of Hereditary Risk
Dr. Angela Bradbury was awarded funding for this Communication and Risk Assessment Award to study communication about hereditary cancer risk within families, with a focus on adolescents. Her work aims to inform interventions that increase preventative behaviors and minimize adverse psychological outcomes in adolescents and young adults from BRCA families.