As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses different types of hereditary breast cancer.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses alcohol and how it relates to cancer risk.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, to reduce hereditary cancer risk.

The Seventh Annual Basser Center Scientific Symposium, "BRCA1, BRCA2 and Beyond: An Update on Hereditary Cancer," held at the University of Pennsylvania on Tuesday, May 7, and Wednesday, May 8, featured Keynote speaker and Basser Global Prize awardee Maria Jasin, PhD, from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Jasin spoke with us about recent BRCA-related research. 

In Carlette’s family, cancer was all too familiar and clearly hereditary. Her mother was diagnosed with cancer at a young age, and eventually succumbed to her cancer, just as Carlette’s grandmother and many of her great aunts did before her.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses hereditary cancer risk for BRCA mutation carriers and ways in which that might impact individuals differently.

This is part of an ongoing blog series featuring informational essays and personal stories from members of the Basser Young Leadership Council. This piece was written by Jourdan Cohen, a digital marketer and BRCA1 mutation-carrier. She is the co-chair of the Basser Center Young Leadership Council's social media committee, and has written about her experiences with undergoing a mastectomy for ELLE.com.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses the differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and explains how the varying risk factors could impact individuals and their families.

When a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is detected early, the information can be life saving. While everyone is born with BRCA genes, Ashkenazi or Eastern European Jews are up to ten times more likely than the general population to carry a BRCA mutation.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses how BRCA mutations impact men, including which cancers they are at hereditary risk for and recommendations for screening.