In Carlette’s family, cancer was all too familiar and clearly hereditary. Her mother was diagnosed with cancer at a young age, and eventually succumbed to her cancer, just as Carlette’s grandmother and many of her great aunts did before her.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses hereditary cancer risk for BRCA mutation carriers and ways in which that might impact individuals differently.

This is part of an ongoing blog series featuring informational essays and personal stories from members of the Basser Young Leadership Council. This piece was written by Jourdan Cohen, a digital marketer and BRCA1 mutation-carrier. She is the co-chair of the Basser Center Young Leadership Council's social media committee, and has written about her experiences with undergoing a mastectomy for ELLE.com.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses the differences between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and explains how the varying risk factors could impact individuals and their families.

When a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is detected early, the information can be life saving. While everyone is born with BRCA genes, Ashkenazi or Eastern European Jews are up to ten times more likely than the general population to carry a BRCA mutation.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses how BRCA mutations impact men, including which cancers they are at hereditary risk for and recommendations for screening.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses BRCA-related ovarian cancer risk and management options, such as recent research into fallopian tube removal.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center for BRCA, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses typical guidelines for follow up to a potential recurrence of BRCA-related breast cancer.

As part of an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses early screening recommendations for young women with BRCA mutations, particularly in terms of breast cancer.

Dr. Domchek: One of our questions is what type of screening options are available to a 25 year old woman who has just been found to have a BRCA1/2 mutation.

In the first in an ongoing series of answers to common questions received by the Basser Center, Executive Director Susan Domchek, MD, discusses recent advancements in treatment options for BRCA-related cancers, such as drugs like PARP inhibitors.